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Nick Kyrgios’ lawyer aims to ‘finalise’ assault matter but loses secrecy bid

Paul Karp

Paul Karp

The ACT magistrates court has adjourned Nick Kyrgios’ matter to 4 October, rejecting his lawyer’s bid for a longer delay until November for an application he foreshadowed may finalise the matter.

In July Australian Capital Territory policing confirmed that Kyrgios had been summonsed to face a charge of assaulting his former girlfriend. It relates to an incident in Canberra last December.

On Tuesday, Kyrgios’ lawyer, Michael Kukulies-Smith, asked the case’s magistrate, Louise Taylor, to adjourn the case to 25 November, a time he said that Kyrgios would be back in the ACT and before Kukulies-Smith would go on leave in December and January.

Kukulies-Smith foreshadowed an application on that date “capable of finalising the matter” but said he did not wish to say more, noting the many journalists present in court. Kukulies-Smith said he did not want to take up time making an application for the court to be closed.

Taylor said:

I am not sure what the case is for the secrecy … [The proposed November date is] an indulgence for you and your client. I am not going to list the matter on the basis of some application that might be made.

The ACT DPP did not oppose the application, but Taylor rejected the request to “set aside time for some unknown reason”, noting the ordinary process is to ask the defendant “if there is a plea of guilty or not guilty”.

As a fallback, Kyrgios’ lawyer asked for a 6-week adjournment. Taylor granted it, listing the matter for 4 October.

In July, an ACT Policing spokesperson said:

ACT policing can confirm a 27-year-old Watson man is scheduled to face the ACT magistrates court on 2 August in relation to one charge of common assault following an incident in December 2021.

Key events

ACT records no Covid deaths and 119 people in hospital.

There were 258 new cases in the last reporting period, and two people are in intensive care.

ACT COVID-19 update – 23 August 2022
🦠 COVID-19 case numbers
◾ New cases today: 258 (127 PCR and 131 RAT)
◾ Active cases: 1,586
◾ Total cases since March 2020: 200,796 pic.twitter.com/Dc2aOC6EHw

— ACT Health (@ACTHealth) August 23, 2022

Peter Hannam

Peter Hannam

Modest uptick in consumer confidence

More signs that consumers are weathering the rate rises, with the weekly confidence survey from ANZ and Roy-Morgan showing another – modest – uptick.

More sign of consumer sentiment holding up, with @ANZ_Research and Roy-Morgan’s weekly gauge of confidence picking up again. It’s now back to early June levels with most sub-indices perking up as well. pic.twitter.com/yCrtCBWK9g

— Peter Hannam (@p_hannam) August 23, 2022

ANZ’s head of Australian Economics, David Plank, said the unemployment rate dropping to 3.4% in July – the lowest since August 1974 – “might have helped boost sentiment, though the news on wages, especially in real terms, was disappointing”.

Plank said:

Consistent with this, confidence is still exceptionally low; but consumers are modestly optimistic about their future financial situation despite the prospect of further increases in interest rates.

Also heading in the right way are inflation expectations, which have been easing back. The RBA’s rate rises are intended to squelch such concerns, so they’ll presumably be happy about that (with the usual caveats about one week at a time, of course) …

Also notable from the @ANZ_Research is a slide in inflation expectations, which will be of interest (sts) for the RBA. (Investors are still predicting the cash rate will double by next June to 3.75% from 1.85% now.) pic.twitter.com/d9Hr8IQNQ1

— Peter Hannam (@p_hannam) August 23, 2022

What’s happening at the petrol pump will also influence inflation views, of course.

That’s not just a function of what global oil prices do, but also what margin service stations take. In the most recent week, that margin has fattened again, the Australian Institute of Petroleum notes:

Fuel prices underpin inflation worries to a big degree. The latest weekly data from the Australian Institute of Petroleum show average retail prices rose to 172.4 cents/litre last week from 168.8. Wholesale prices, though, fell from 155.5 cents to 152.9, hence the widening gap. pic.twitter.com/jCb1eS87Yv

— Peter Hannam (@p_hannam) August 23, 2022

The fuel excise “holiday” ends late on 28 September, with 22.1 cents a litre to be added back then … unless the Albanese government changes its mind about not extending the six-month cut in the excise.

Andrew Giles criticises previous government’s disconnect between immigrations and skills

The immigration and citizenship minister, Andrew Giles, told Sky News this morning he isn’t putting a number on the increase to migration but it has to be the “right number to meet the challenges of the moment and set ourselves up for the future”.

Immigration has to be seen fundamentally as part of a nation-building role of national government, and it is something that has been neglected over the last nine years of conservative governments and that has created some of the challenges we are responding to.

We’ve got to look at it as a whole. We can’t have this lazy approach to immigration that’s so often characterised the last nine years, which separated the immigration function of government from that connected to skills and training.

We’ve got to recognise that we’re in a global competition for talent.

Nick Kyrgios’ lawyer aims to ‘finalise’ assault matter but loses secrecy bid

Paul Karp

Paul Karp

The ACT magistrates court has adjourned Nick Kyrgios’ matter to 4 October, rejecting his lawyer’s bid for a longer delay until November for an application he foreshadowed may finalise the matter.

In July Australian Capital Territory policing confirmed that Kyrgios had been summonsed to face a charge of assaulting his former girlfriend. It relates to an incident in Canberra last December.

On Tuesday, Kyrgios’ lawyer, Michael Kukulies-Smith, asked the case’s magistrate, Louise Taylor, to adjourn the case to 25 November, a time he said that Kyrgios would be back in the ACT and before Kukulies-Smith would go on leave in December and January.

Kukulies-Smith foreshadowed an application on that date “capable of finalising the matter” but said he did not wish to say more, noting the many journalists present in court. Kukulies-Smith said he did not want to take up time making an application for the court to be closed.

Taylor said:

I am not sure what the case is for the secrecy … [The proposed November date is] an indulgence for you and your client. I am not going to list the matter on the basis of some application that might be made.

The ACT DPP did not oppose the application, but Taylor rejected the request to “set aside time for some unknown reason”, noting the ordinary process is to ask the defendant “if there is a plea of guilty or not guilty”.

As a fallback, Kyrgios’ lawyer asked for a 6-week adjournment. Taylor granted it, listing the matter for 4 October.

In July, an ACT Policing spokesperson said:

ACT policing can confirm a 27-year-old Watson man is scheduled to face the ACT magistrates court on 2 August in relation to one charge of common assault following an incident in December 2021.

Energy change needs thousands of electricians

Australia must train tens of thousands of new sparkies if it wants to be a renewable energy superpower, according to the Electrical Trades Union, AAP reports.

The warning comes as the climate change and energy minister, Chris Bowen, hosts a jobs summit in Canberra on Tuesday with industry, unions, environmental groups and community advocates.

Electrical apprentice completion rates currently sit at just 52%, which is too low if Australia is to overhaul energy and industrial processes to meet its climate commitments, Michael Wright, the acting secretary of the ETU, said.

The federal government is setting aside $100m to support 10,000 New Energy Apprenticeships. But electrical apprentices are failing to complete their training because of the soaring cost of living and lack of mentoring, according to a survey conducted by Essential Media for the union.

Wright said:

Australia will need tens of thousands of skilled electrical workers to connect renewables like solar, wind and batteries to our electricity grid.

The survey of 642 electrical apprentices showed more than a third (37%) were thinking about quitting.

Man on roof connecting solar panels
The Electrical Trades Union says tens of thousands of new workers will be required to help connect renewables to the grid. Photograph: SolStock/Getty Images

Tory Shepherd

New SA River Murray commissioner gives hope for state’s water management

Richard Beasley, the bluntly spoken senior counsel in the 2019 South Australian Murray-Darling Basin royal commission, has been appointed as SA’s River Murray commissioner.

Beasley recently described efforts in NSW and Victoria to stymie part of the Murray-Darling Basin Plan that would deliver 450 gigalitres of environmental water as a “pretty rotten way to operate”.

State water minister Susan Close said:

Mr Beasley’s appointment will ensure South Australia’s voice is heard when it comes to the management of the River Murray. His time on the Murray-Darling Basin royal commission showed he has a great capacity to connect people and build relationships, skills that will be vital in his role as commissioner.

He will also be a much-needed voice for our river communities. Having a commissioner for the River Murray sends a clear message to upstream states that SA is serious about defending its water rights, including the 450 gigalitres promised but not delivered.

Mr Beasley has a deep understanding of the issues relating to the river and the entire Murray-Darling Basin, and I look forward to working closely with him to fight for the future of the river.

‘We shouldn’t have to fight this hard to get a train fixed,’ union says

The Rail, Tram and Bus Union NSW secretary Alex Claassens yesterday defended the latest rail action. He told Channel 9:

We kept working all the way through Covid, we delivered a service, and we deserve better respect than this. We shouldn’t have to fight this hard to get a train fixed and we certainly shouldn’t have to fight this hard to get decent wages and conditions. It’s ridiculous.

NSW Labor should tell unions to end strikes, treasurer says

Circling back to that Sky News interview with NSW treasurer Matt Kean who was also asked about the train delays Sydney commuters continue to see due to ongoing dispute between the government and the transport workers union.

Kean is accusing the unions of waging “industrial warfare” and “holding the NSW public to ransom … over something NSW government said it would fix”.

Kean has urged opposition leader Chris Minns to tell unions to end the strikes.

Victoria records 25 new Covid deaths and 433 people in hospital

There were 3,638 new cases in the last reporting period and 26 people are in intensive care.

NSW records 32 more Covid deaths and 1,928 people in hospital

There were 5,567 new cases in the last reporting period and 49 people are in intensive care.

COVID-19 update – Tuesday 23 August 2022
In the 24-hour reporting period to 4pm yesterday:
– 96.9% of people aged 16+ have had one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine*
– 95.4% of people aged 16+ have had two doses of a COVID-19 vaccine* pic.twitter.com/UtNbnZPxwM

— NSW Health (@NSWHealth) August 22, 2022

‘Just need to start stamping passports’: Kean criticises federal jobs summit

NSW treasurer Matt Kean has continued his criticism of the Albanese’s jobs and skills summit while appearing on Sky News this morning.

Kean said there is a backlog of 65,000 skilled workers waiting to enter Australia.

He says what’s needed more than the jobs and skills summit is for the government to “start stamping passports”.

He is urging the government to stop waiting for permission from the unions and bureaucratic processes.

NSW treasurer Matt Kean.
NSW treasurer Matt Kean. Photograph: Monique Harmer/AAP